The number of languages ​​in Switzerland

German, French, Italian, and Romansh are the national and official languages ​​of Switzerland, and the following table shows the order of these official languages ​​and other languages ​​spoken in Switzerland in terms of the percentage of speakers in the country:[1]

ranking

the language

Percentage of speakers in the country

1-

German or Swiss German

63%

2-

French

22.7%

3-

Italian

8.1%

4-

English

4.9%

5-

Portuguese

3.7%

7-

Serbo-Croatian

2.4%

8-

Spanish

2.2%

9-

Romansh

0.5%

10-

other language

7.1%

Note: Switzerland does not have a common language in it, and all Swiss must learn at least two languages ​​at school, and unlike many other European countries, Switzerland tolerates every language spoken in it.[2]

German language

The Swiss German language is the most widely spoken language in transactions. It is divided into local dialects. In writing, the Swiss use the original German language. The Swiss dialect is dominant in Bern, the capital of Switzerland, and Zurich, its largest city, and the official language in Berne provinces is French.[2]

French language

Romandy is the region in which the French language predominates in Switzerland, and this region covers the provinces of: Geneva, Jura, Vaud, Neuchâtel, parts of Berne, Valais, and Fribourg. Unlike Swiss German, which has many dialects, standard Swiss French is similar to The French language is in France with some minor differences between them.[2]

Italian Language

Italian Switzerland is that part of the country where only Italian is spoken, and these areas include: the provinces of Tineco, the Gondo Valley in Valais, and the southern region of Graubünden. Like in Switzerland, Standard Italian is the official language of writing.[2]

Romansh language

The Romansh language is spread in northern Italy, and the State of Switzerland in particular in the Rhine Valley in the Swiss province of Graubünden, and since 1938 the Romansh language has been the national language of the cantons, and the referendum that took place in 1996 gave it a semi-official status, and this language is spoken in two different dialects: Sorsilvan ; It is spoken on the west bank of the Rhine, Sutsilvan; It is spoken on the east bank of the Rhine.[3]

the reviewer

  1. ↑ “EUROPE:: SWITZERLAND”, www.cia.gov, 12-12-2017, Retrieved 23-12-2017. Edited.
  2. ^ a b c Benjamin Elisha Sawe(25-4-2017), “Languages ​​Spoken In Switzerland”, www.worldatlas.com, Retrieved 23-12-2017. Edited.
  3. ↑ The Editors of Encyclopædia Britannica, “Romansh language”, www.britannica.com, Retrieved 23-12-2017. Edited.

The number of languages ​​in Switzerland

writing – on the date : – Last updated: 2022-05-30 10:42:01