Soil contamination

Soil pollution can be defined as the entry of harmful and harmful elements into it, and these elements can have a negative impact on the quality of the soil and the health of the neighborhoods that live on it. It is a byproduct of some other activity.[1]

Soil Pollution Sources

Among the sources of soil pollution are the following:[2]

  • industrial waste; Industrial waste is the worst soil pollutant, by polluting the soil with solid or liquid chemicals.
  • organic sources; Like carcasses of animals, and dead plants.[3]
  • radioactive sources.[3]
  • Excessive use of pesticides and fertilizers; The increasing demand for food has forced farmers to use fertilizers and pesticides that release pollutants into the soil and kill microorganisms necessary for plant growth.
  • Waste; Where non-recyclable waste causes soil pollution, and some of this waste sometimes takes thousands of years to decompose.

The effect of soil pollution on humans

The negative impact of soil pollution may result from direct contact with contaminated soil, or from other sources such as water that has been in direct contact with it. Among the negative effects that soil pollution causes on humans are the following:[4]

  • cancer; Many substances that cause soil pollution are considered carcinogens, according to the US Environmental Protection Agency; People who are exposed to these pollutants are more likely to develop cancer than others.
  • economic losses.
  • organ damage; Although mercury and lead are naturally present in the soil, high concentrations of these elements may cause damage to brain development in children, which in turn may lead to neurological problems, and people of different ages may suffer from kidney or liver problems due to exposure. To high concentrations of mercury in the soil.

the reviewer

  1. ↑ SUZANNE S. WILEY (13-6-2017), “Definition of Soil Pollution”, www.livestrong.com, Retrieved 23-5-2018. Edited.
  2. ↑ LOUISE BETHANY (3-4-2017), “SOIL CONTAMINATION: ITS CAUSES, EFFECTS, AND SOLUTIONS”, www.orgpermaculturenews.org, Retrieved 23-5-2018. Edited.
  3. ^ AP “Soil hygiene”, www.semmelweis.hu, Retrieved 23-5-2018.page 8. Edited.
  4. ↑ AL KENNEDY (13-6-2017), “The Effects of Soil Pollution on Humans”, www.livestrong.com, Retrieved 23-5-2018. Edited.

Definition of soil pollution

Writing – on the date : – Last updated: 2022-05-14 11:30:01