Foreground

Most of the poems began with the Talli introductions that the Bedouin poets of the Abbasid era imitated the ancients, as they carried deep meanings between them. Such as the meanings of annihilation, departure, and pain over the departure of the beloved, and they were employed in particular in the field of praising the caliphs and flirting with the beloved,[1] Then some revolted against the Talian premises and invented new ones that fit their era; such as the introductions of wine, and the introductions to the description of nature, and the introductions to judgment.[2]

Avoid long poems

Abbasid poets stayed away from long poems; So they arranged their poetry in small pieces; This is due to the nature of civilized development; The Arabs no longer met as they did in the old days in the markets to listen to those poems that were organized by the ignorant people. The community’s ultimate goal is no longer to taste and hear poetry, but rather turn to the many concerns of life; such as commerce, industry, and agriculture, in addition to the fact that poetry is now talking about one topic, which does not require the poet to write long poems, but rather is limited to a few verses; Unlike the ancients, whose poems varied in topics, making them long. It is worth noting that the spread of singing left a great impact on poets; It prompted them to arrange their poetry into a small, singable piece of music.[3]

Renewal in meanings and ideas

Many poets tended to renew their meanings and ideas, and this was evident in their poems. Poetry was crowded with ideas, meanings, images and fantasies, and they also resorted to exaggeration, exaggeration, embodiment and amplification. Its use while in some poems it was reprehensible and without beauty.[4]

Renovation in style

The cultural, urban and civilizational development had a great impact on the language and style of poetry; The style was characterized by smoothness, ease and softness, except in some Bedouin terms that need explanation, while the methods used by poets in this era varied; Some of them followed a style that was far from pretentiousness and manipulation and had the freedom to dispose of how to present their idea, with keenness on objective unity, and freedom from the paradoxical templates that the ancients were bound by in building their poems. And Bedouin images with resort to the use of exotic images.[5]

Weights and rhymes

Some poets organized their poetry according to the well-known traditional weights, while others introduced weights that suit the spirit of their era and their poetic taste, and they renewed the rhyme as well. So they created the double, the musmat, and the khums. The double is the agreement of the two opposite halves with the same rhyme, although it differs from one house to another. As for the musmat, it is a poem consisting of roles, and the role in it consists of four parts in which the rhyme agrees in three parts, and is unique in the fourth part to be called the masmat column. , As for the mukhamsat, it is like a muscat in that it consists of roles, where each role consists of five parts, the first four parts agree in rhyme, and are fixed in the fifth part.[6]

inner music

The poets of the Abbasid era were greatly influenced by the pre-Islamic poets in terms of music. Their inner music took many forms, including: the repetition of words or what was derived from them, and inlaying; It is an analogy of the words of the first chapter with the second chapter in terms of weights and miracles, and the inflection that abounds in the beginning of the poems; It is the agreement of the rhyme of the first part of the house with the rhyme of the second part.[7]

Popular character in the poem

In the past, poems were limited to the aristocracy. Poetry dealt with issues of the ruling class. Then the poets’ kiss changed in the Abbasid era and included all segments of society; They described the garden, the wine, the lion, the river, the old woman, the youth, the maidservants, the boys, the baker, the candy-maker, and others, and they described besides that the spiritual aspect of their society that is not perceptible to the senses.[8]

the reviewer

  1. ↑ City of Zubair, Bedouin Poets in the First Abbasid Era, Sudan: Sudan University of Science and Technology, p. 156. Adapted.
  2. ↑ Sakina Kadour (2012-2013), Lectures in the literature of the Abbasid era, Constantine: Prince Abdul Qader University for Islamic Sciences, p. 28. Adapted.
  3. ↑ Sakina Kadour (2012-2013), Lectures in the literature of the Abbasid era, Constantine: Prince Abdul Qadir University for Islamic Sciences, p. 27-28. act.
  4. ↑ Nazim Rashid (1989), Arabic Literature in the Abbasid Era, Mosul: Dar Al-Kutub Directorate for Printing and Publishing, pg. 72-76-78. act.
  5. ↑ City of Zubair, Bedouin Poets in the First Abbasid Era, Sudan: Sudan University of Science and Technology, page 180. Adapted.
  6. ↑ Nazim Rashid (1989), Arabic Literature in the Abbasid Era, Mosul: Dar Al-Kutub Directorate for Printing and Publishing, p. 84-86. act.
  7. ↑ City of Zubair, Bedouin Poets in the First Abbasid Era, Sudan: Sudan University of Science and Technology, p. 184-185. act.
  8. ↑ Sakina Kadour (2012-2013), Lectures in the literature of the Abbasid era, Constantine: Prince Abdul Qadir University for Islamic Sciences, p. 32-33. act.

Characteristics of poetry in the Abbasid era

writing – on the date : – Last updated: 2022-06-20 03:39:01